Monday, September 10, 2007

Tambu Wheels



During the ceremony the man’s shell money, that had been wound onto wheels during his lifetime, were broken open. (In the top picture you can see the now empty wheels at the back and the collected fathoms hanging at the front).


The names of his relatives are called and the women of these families, wearing black and with lime powder on their bodies, distributed the collected fathoms to the clan (second photo).


Tambu is also used for bride price, for paying compensation and in the villages, for buying goods and services. At the ceremony women were selling snacks and drinks which were being paid for with shell money fathoms. (you can see them in the basket in the third photo).


Extra - On my other blog Rabaul Daily – Extra Photos there are some photos I took of Rabaul yesterday for Pia,
and there are also some bilum photos I took for Eliane.

14 comments:

Pia said...

Hi Jules,
I pop up everywhere.
A fact for your readers. The tolais follow their mother's line in kinship and land rights terms. Very empowering to us girls in a patriarchal world.
Pia

Pia said...

Jules,
What time is a good time to catch you at worl?
Pia

Old Wom Tigley said...

Jules I have found this very interesting, but most of all I have enjoy the pictures. What a beautyful place, where old customs are still carried on...

• Eliane • said...

I love to learn about those customs. And thanks for the special post. I feel very honored!

oldmanlincoln said...

Amazing photos and very nice story with them.

Jules said...

Pia - I fly out on Friday so Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday after 11:30 am is good.
Cheers

Annie said...

The traditions of people all over the world vary a lot and each different one is fascinating and rich in history. You reminded me of that today, Jules.

quintino said...

If I understand correctly what Pia wrote, amoung the tolais women rule...
Nice photos and good information, Jules.

Neva said...

Loved these pictures....goodness knows we women need all the help we can get in some society's!

dive said...

Wonderful pictures, Jules. And what a nice tradition.

Marie said...

I find that "super"! You make us travel through your wonderful pictures and you make us learn a lot about people we will never have had the opportunity to meet otherwise. Thank you very much.

M.Benaut said...

Howdy Jules; just back from down south.
We certainly are learning much about the culture and customs of this society, so different from our artificial western 'kulture'.
I think that the 'west' has lost the simple elegance of life.
I was going to say that the lady with the blonde hair, probably has broadband; but in retrospect, that would sound banal, so I won't.
I had an uncle who was a missionary in East Africa and he taught me many of the customs of the indigenous people. They, as those in your area, are proud and beautiful people. When you get to know them, as I am sure that you do, their customs are profound, especially as they have been handed down over, not centuries, but tens of thousands of years.

Bergson said...

Superb a blog which informs us and which makes us travel

Jules said...

So glad you have found this interesting - i was honoured to have been asked.

I was given a meri blouse to wear so may post a photo of myself in it - one day!!!!